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"With the infallibility bestowed on her by the Lord, the Church clearly teaches that Jesus appointed Peter to be the first of all the Apostles and to be the visible head of the whole Church; he also immediately and personally gave Peter a true primacy of jurisdiction over the Church." [Anyone who denies this is anathema, according to Vatican I - Denzinger 1823 - Baker, p. 108]

            Kenneth Baker, S.J., Fundamentals of Catholicism, 3 vols., San Francisco: Ignatius Press, 1982, III, p. 107. Matthew 16:17-19. "If anyone says that the canon of the Mass contains errors and should therefore be abrogated, let him be anathema." [Chapter IV, Canon VI] Chemnitz:

 

"The power, yes, the substance and as it were the soul of the papalist sacrifice is the canon of the Mass. Therefore they labor much more for its retention than about the canon of Scripture itself, which they are not afraid to corrupt by mixing in other, noncanonical books."

            Martin Chemnitz, Examination of the Council of Trent, trans., Fred Kramer, St. Louis: Concordia Publishing House, 1986, II, p. 508.

 

"You are either reproaching and cursing Jesus, or praising him and owning him your Lord. If your preaching and teaching fail to point to Christ, something else being offered, and you nevertheless boast of the Spirit, you are already judged: the spirit you boast is not the Holy Spirit, not the true Spirit, but a false one. To it we are not to listen. Rather we are condemn it to the abyss of hell, as Paul declares, (Galatians 1:8), saying: 'But though we, or an angel from heaven, should preach unto you any Gospel other than that which we preached unto you, let him be anathema [damned to Hell].'"

            Martin Luther, Sermons of Martin Luther, ed. John Nicolas Lenker, Grand Rapids: Baker Book House, 1983, VIII, p. 206. Tenth Sunday after Trinity, 1 Corinthians 12:1-11; Galatians 1:8

 

"Whereas the power of conferring indulgences was granted by Christ to the church, and it has used this power, divinely bestowed on it, even from the most ancient times, the most holy synod teaches and commands that the use of indulgences, which is mot salutary to Christian people and has been approved by the authority of sacred councils, is to be retained in the church, and condemns with the anathema [damnation to Hell] those who either assert that they are useless or deny that the power of granting them resides in the church." [Session XXV, Council of Trent, December 4, 1563]

            Martin Chemnitz, Examination of the Council of Trent, trans., Fred Kramer, St. Louis: Concordia Publishing House, 1986, IV, p. 145.

 

"If anyone says that justifying faith is nothing else than trust in divine mercy, which remits sins for Christ's sake, or that it is this trust alone by which we are justified, let him be anathema [damned to Hell]." [Session Six, Canon XII]

            Martin Chemnitz, Examination of the Council of Trent, trans., Fred Kramer, St. Louis: Concordia Publishing House, 1971, I, p. 460.

 

"If anyone says that a man is absolved from sins and justified because of this that he confidently believes that he is absolved and justified, or that no one is truly justified except he who believes that he is justified, and that through this faith alone absolution and justification is effected, let him be anathema [damned to Hell]." [Sixth Session, Canon XIV]

            Martin Chemnitz, Examination of the Council of Trent, trans., Fred Kramer, St. Louis: Concordia Publishing House, 1971, I, p. 551.

 

"If anyone says that Christ Jesus was given to men by God as a redeemer in whom they should believe, and not also as a lawgiver whom they should obey, let him be anathema [damned to Hell]."

            Martin Chemnitz, Examination of the Council of Trent, trans., Fred Kramer, St. Louis: Concordia Publishing House, 1971, I, p. 617.

 

"If anyone shall say that a man once justified...can through the whole of life avoid all sins, even though they be venial, except by a special privilege of God, as the Church holds to have been the case with the Blessed Virgin, let him be anathema [damned to Hell]." [Session VI, Canon 27 1547]

            Paul F. Palmer, S.J., Mary in the Documents of the Church, Gerald G. Walsh, S.J., Westminster, Maryland: The Newman Press 1952, p. 77.

 

Pope Honorius had been anathematized by 3 ecumenical councils and at least 55 popes "...this anathema had been read once a year in the breviary by every priest in the Latin Church for centuries."

            James Hastings Nichols, History of Christianity, 1650-1950, New York: The Ronald Press Company, 1956, p. 215. Pope Pius IX

 

"Where, however, the dispute is about a very obscure matter, and the divine Scriptures do not help us with sure and clear documents, human presumption ought to restrain itself and not incline to one side. Rather, if any one proclaims anything about any matter which pertains to our faith and life as a sure and necessary dogma or article of faith, over and above what you have received in the Scripture of the Law and of the Gospel, let him be anathema!" Augustine, Contra litteras Petiliani

            Martin Chemnitz, Examination of the Council of Trent, trans., Fred Kramer, St. Louis: Concordia Publishing House, 1986, III, p. 260f.

 

"If anyone says that the sacraments of the New Law were not all instituted by our Lord Jesus Christ, or that there are either more or fewer than seven, namely, baptism, confirmation, the Eucharist, penance, extreme unction, ordination, and marriage, or also that some of these seven are not truly and properly sacraments, let him be anathema." [Session VII, Canon I]

            Martin Chemnitz, Examination of the Council of Trent, trans., Fred Kramer, St. Louis: Concordia Publishing House, 1986, II, p. 21.

 

"If anyone says that in the most holy sacrament of the Eucharist the substance of bread and wine remain, together with the body and blood of our Lord Jesus Christ, and denies the wonderful and unique conversion of the total substance of the bread into the body and of the total substance of the wine into the blood, so that only the appearances of bread and wine remain, which conversion the catholic Church very fittingly calls transubstantiation, let him be anathema." [Chapter IV, Canon II]

            Martin Chemnitz, Examination of the Council of Trent, trans., Fred Kramer, St. Louis: Concordia Publishing House, 1986, II, p. 253.